Counselor Spotlight

01/11/19

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  A reboot can help your child get back on the right track
When you run into a problem on your laptop or smartphone, do you ever power it off and restart it? Rebooting a device can help it correct processing issues and start over.
L. K. Moss students received Second Nine Weeks report cards on Wednesday, January 9th.  If your child’s school year is not going as well as you’d hoped, it may be time to help him/her reboot, too! Here are a few Ways to help your child reboot to get back on track:  1.) Make change a family affair. If you’ve decided that your child needs to spend more time doing homework, make study time quiet time for the whole family. You can work on paperwork or read while your child works.  2.)  Replace bad habits. Breaking a habit is hard. It’s much easier to put a different one in its place. If your child is in the habit of watching TV as soon as he/she walks in the door, suggest reading for 30 minutes instead. Your child will still have a chance to relax while strengthening reading skills.  3.)  Get organized. This month, you can find lots of great-looking calendars available on sale. Look for one your child will enjoy using. Then help him/her get into the habit of writing down things like the day a book report is due and soccer practice days. That can help avoid a last-minute panic. 4.)  Celebrate successes. Help your child see the link between new habits and positive results. “You studied for that test and got nine out of 10 correct. That’s great!”  (**Revised and reprinted with permission from the January 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)

 

 

01/04/19

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Review the school year and make necessary adjustments
Happy New Year!!! It’s the beginning of a new calendar year—and the halfway point in the school year. It’s a good time to take stock of your child’s habits and make needed adjustments.  Talk with your child about how the school year is going. If the two of you had set learning goals at the start of the year, review those goals now. Is progress being made? How can the rest of the school year be even better?  Then, help your child make some resolutions. Here are Three New Year’s Resolutions to consider:  1.)  Recommit to routines. Has your child’s bedtime begun to slip? Are mornings more rushed? Is his/her regular study time now not quite so regular? Sleep and study routines make life easier—and help kids do better in school. 2.)  Spend more time reading. There is no skill that will help your child more in school. Reading ability, like other skills, gets better with practice. Encourage your child to read every day. Let him/her read about anything, from sports to a favorite movie character.  3.)  Spend less time on screen media. Talk about the amount of time your child spends in front of screens. How much time is spent watching shows and movies? Playing online games? Browsing the internet? Set and enforce limits.  (**Revised and reprinted with permission from the January 2019 issue of Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)

12/7/18

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Midyear is the perfect time to view your child’s attendance
The halfway point of the school year is approaching. It’s time for a mid-year checkup on your child’s attendance.  Each year in the United States, close to eight million students are at risk academically because they are chronically absent. Here’s what Researchers Reviews have found:  1.)  School absences add up. When students aren’t in school, they miss out on valuable learning.  2.)  Missing school becomes a habit. Students who miss a lot of school in kindergarten are still frequently absent in fifth grade.  3.)  There is a clear relationship between early attendance and later achievement. Kids who come to school regularly in the early grades are still doing well in secondary school—and they are more likely to graduate from high school.  How many days of school has your child missed this year? If you’re unsure, contact the school to find out. It’s not too late to get back on track so he can have a successful school year—and school career. If your child has perfect attendance thus far, challenge them to keep it up.  Remember:  All students having perfect attendance for the 2nd Nine Weeks of School will receive a special invitation to Counselor’s Awards Day to reward their achievement. (Revised and reprinted with permission from the December 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)

 

11/30/18

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Preparation is key to your child’s test success
As we move into the Christmas holiday season and all its excitement, it is important that we continue to encourage our children to do quality classwork and homework.  Most importantly, we must insure that our students continue studying for tests as we will also complete our Second Nine Weeks/First Semester of school during this time.  When your child’s teacher announces there will be a test next week. “Please start preparing now,” she tells families. What steps should you follow? Try these Tips for Test Success:  1.)  Clarify what will be tested. Have your child check with the teacher to find out what the test will cover. He/she should also find out what kind of test it will be (fill in the blanks, multiple choice, etc.).  2.)  Make a plan. Studying works best when it’s done over time— not at the last minute. Help your child schedule several study sessions and write them on the calendar.  3.)  Think of ways to reinforce the material. Your child could make flash cards or take a practice test. You could quiz each other on the material.  4.)  Encourage good habits. In addition to doing homework and studying, your child needs rest and nourishment to do his/her best in school. A regular bedtime and healthy meals go a long way!  5.)  Make attendance a priority. It’s hard for students to keep up when they miss school or arrive late. Reduce stress on test day by making sure your child gets to school on time.  6.)  Ease anxiety. Make plenty of positive comments. “You are prepared for this test. You’re going to do great on it!” There’s no need to pressure your child. Support and preparation are all he/she needs!  (**Revised and reprinted with permission from the November 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)

 

 

 

COUNSELORS AWARD DAY:  “Sundae Social on Tuesday”
L.K. Moss students receiving honor roll and/or perfect attendance for the 1st Nine Weeks of school participated in an unforgettable Counselors Awards Day on Tuesday, November 6th. Ms. Sales and Mrs. Price hosted a “Sundae Social on Tuesday”. In order to attend this special event, students received personalized invitations. Students enjoyed ice cream sundaes with various delicious toppings while socializing with friends. We ended the social by challenging the students to come to school every day this 2nd Nine Weeks of school and make all A’s so that they will receive another invitation to the 2nd Nine Weeks Counselors Award Day.   The response to 1st Nine Weeks Counselors Award Day event has been overwhelming, and we look forward to conducting more exciting Counselors Award Day events like this at the end of each nine weeks throughout this year.  

 

 

11/02/18

 
COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Life is Your Journey.  Travel Drug Free

October 23rd-27th is designated as RED RIBBON WEEK.  The theme for this year’s celebration was “Life is Your Journey.  Travel Drug Free”.  At L. K. Moss, students participated in dress-up days as well as other special activities that emphasized the importance of being drug free.     Because we want all of our “little friends” to live happy, healthy lives, we visited all of them and discussed some of the harmful drugs and how they can hurt our bodies.  As parents, we must start early and encourage our children daily to be drug free When talking with your child, try these Statements in reminding your child that “Life is Your Journey.  Travel Drug Free”:   1.) Strive for good grades…Drugs will make you an underachiever! 2.)  Pride yourself on being attractive and well-groomed…Drugs will trash your looks!  3.)  Choose to hang out with winners…Drugs will land you with the losers!  4.)  Lead a healthy and active life…Drugs will run you down! 5.)  Do your best in sports and athletics…Drugs will foul you out!  6.)  Dream big things for your future…Drugs will turn dreams into nightmares!  **REMEMBER:  Life is Your Journey.  Travel Drug FREE!

 

 

Attendance

 

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Make Perfect Attendance a School –Year Challenge
In celebration of Attendance Awareness Month, I challenged all of my “little friends” in Pre-Kindergarten thru 5th grade to come to school on time every day and have perfect attendance for the month of September.  Well, guess what?  I had some “little friends” who did just that!! To celebrate their accomplishment, these students will be honored with a special Sock Hop in the gym.  How well did your child’s grade level do in the Attendance Awareness Challenge?  Here are the Results of the Perfect Attendance Challenge

 

09/04-9/07 (Before Challenge)

09/11-14

09/17-21

09/24-28

Pre-Kindergarten

85%

82%

85%

77%

Kindergarten

79%

82%

81%

83%

First Grade

85%

89%

82%

87%

Second Grade

87%

87%

83%

88%

Third Grade

88%

92%

87%

89%

Fourth Grade

84%

84%

90%

87%

Fifth Grade

87%

91%

84%

84%

**Percentages represent Perfect Attendance for the grade level

As I end my attendance spotlights, I stress that while the challenge and rewards are exciting, the greatest reward that comes from perfect attendance is the learning that takes place when your child is in the classroom.  Help your child to perform better academically and help L.K. Moss to improve our attendance score on our school report card by making daily attendance a priority for the remainder of this school year. **REMINDER: Marion County Board policy states that students in grades K-8 can have not more than fourteen (14) absences per school year.   
 

 

 

 

 

 

10/18/18

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Family meetings promote communication and closeness
Sometimes parents and children get so caught up in outside activities, they forget to make time for one another. Family meetings are a great way to reconnect and remind everyone that family comes first. Here are a few Guidelines for productive family meetings:  1.) Meet regularly at a convenient time. For instance, Tuesdays after dinner, with dessert.  2.)  Keep meetings short—about 30 minutes or less. (But if the family is having fun, don’t stop!)  3.)  Have parents lead meetings. You should make sure rules are followed and have the final say on big decisions.  4.)  Designate someone to take notes at each meeting. This will help everyone remember what was discussed or decided.  5.)  Discuss family news, concerns, goals and successes. Reward accomplishments.  6.)  Give everyone a chance to speak. No one interrupts anyone else. Each person’s opinion deserves respect.  7.)  Don’t use meetings as a time to criticize. Discipline problems should be handled separately.  8.)  Include a fun activity. Play a short game, sing a song or learn a tongue twister.  9.)  Brainstorm ways to improve your meetings. Ask family members how they think the meeting went and see if they have any suggestions for improvement.  (**Reprinted with permission from the October 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)
**ACTIVITY CHALLENGE:  Help your child to earn a reward!  Conduct a family meeting during the Fall Break (October 19-22).  The first five students to visit Ms. Sales on Tuesday, October 23rd with notes and a picture of the family meeting will earn a reward. 
                                     **HAVE A FUN AND SAFE FALL BREAK!!!

 

 

 

 

 

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Make Perfect Attendance a School –Year Challenge
In celebration of Attendance Awareness Month, I challenged all of my “little friends” in Pre-Kindergarten thru 5th grade to come to school on time every day and have perfect attendance for the month of September.  Well, guess what?  I had some “little friends” who did just that!! To celebrate their accomplishment, these students will be honored with a special Sock Hop in the gym.  How well did your child’s grade level do in the Attendance Awareness Challenge?  Here are the Results of the Perfect Attendance Challenge

 

09/04-9/07 (Before Challenge)

09/11-14

09/17-21

09/24-28

Pre-Kindergarten

85%

82%

85%

77%

Kindergarten

79%

82%

81%

83%

First Grade

85%

89%

82%

87%

Second Grade

87%

87%

83%

88%

Third Grade

88%

92%

87%

89%

Fourth Grade

84%

84%

90%

87%

Fifth Grade

87%

91%

84%

84%

**Percentages represent Perfect Attendance for the grade level

As I end my attendance spotlights, I stress that while the challenge and rewards are exciting, the greatest reward that comes from perfect attendance is the learning that takes place when your child is in the classroom.  Help your child to perform better academically and help L.K. Moss to improve our attendance score on our school report card by making daily attendance a priority for the remainder of this school year. **REMINDER: Marion County Board policy states that students in grades K-8 can have not more than fourteen (14) absences per school year.   

09/28/18

COUNSELOR’S  SPOTLIGHT:  Attendance Awareness Month comes to an end
As our Attendance Awareness Month celebration at L. K. Moss comes to an end, I hope our perfect attendance challenge has inspired you and your child to be even more committed to attending school every day.  The reward for students with perfect attendance this final week (October 24-28) is a Free Homework Pass.  Students receiving this pass from their teachers will turn it in instead of homework for one night next week, Oct 1-5. 
Again I stress that while the tangible reward is exciting; the greatest reward that comes from daily attendance is the learning that takes place.  Research shows that missing school regularly can hurt both the students who miss class and their classmates. When students miss school, they miss out on learning. When they return, they have to work harder to catch up. Since most subject matter builds on previous lessons, it doesn't take long for these students to fall behind. As a result, kids who miss school have lower levels of achievement throughout their school careers. Research shows that, by sixth grade, students who miss an average of just one day a week are more likely to drop out of high school.  The students who do come to class also miss out. When teachers have to repeat material or pay extra attention to kids who have been absent, everyone suffers.  **REMINDER: Marion County Board policy states that students in grades K-8 can have not more than fourteen (14) absences per school year.  (Revised and reprinted with permission from Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)

 

 

 

09/21/18

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Are you helping your child earn rewards for perfect attendance?
In celebration of Attendance Awareness Month, students have earned rewards each week by simply coming to school on time each day to have perfect attendance for the week.  Last week (September 11-14), students with perfect attendance were rewarded with Dancing in the Halls and Classrooms.  This activity allowed students to go into the halls and participate in line dancing led by teacher/dancers to music played over the intercom.  Students, then, returned to their classrooms and continued supervised dancing until the school day ended.  Needless to say, the student had a fantastic time!
This week (September 17-21), students with perfect attendance will be rewarded with Hats Off to Perfect Attendance on Monday, September 24, 2018.  This means if your child came to school every day Monday, September 17th thru Friday, September 21st, he/she may wear his/her favorite cap/hat on Monday, September 24th.  *Note:  Please make sure that your child’s hat/cap is appropriate for school.
As we move toward the final week of Attendance Awareness Month (September 24-28), I want all of my “little friends” to have the opportunity to be rewarded.  How can you help?  Because attendance is ultimately a parent’s responsibility, please help your child earn this surprise reward by making sure he/she attends school every day next week.  Most important, please remember that while the surprise reward is fun, the greatest reward is the learning that takes place when your child is present in the classroom the entire day.  # schooleveryday

 

 

09/14/18

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Are you helping your child have perfect attendance?
As I’ve shared previously, September is designated as “Attendance Awareness Month”.  In celebration of Attendance Awareness Month, I have challenged my “little friends” in Pre-Kindergarten – 5th grade to make a commitment to come to school on time each day and have perfect attendance for the remainder of the month starting Tuesday, Sept 11th. Students will earn rewards each week by simply having perfect attendance.  Because attendance is ultimately a parent responsibility, are you reinforcing strong attendance habits? Answer the following Attendance Quiz to find out:  ___1. Have you told your child that you expect him/her to go to school every day? If you share it's important to you, it will become important to your child.  ___2. Do you ignore weak excuses? Not feeling like coming to school isn't a good reason to stay home.  ___3. Do you keep your child home if he/she is really sick?  Often times, fever is the first indicator of true sickness.  Take your child’s temperature and keep him/her at home if fever is 99.0 or higher.  Reducing the spread of illness can help others avoid missing school.  ___4. Do you try to make medical and dental appointments outside of school hours?  L.K.Moss’ school day begins at 7:55 a.m. and ends at 2:40 p.m. Schedule appointments after this time if possible.   ___5. Do you help your child set the alarm clock earlier if he/she has trouble getting to school on time?  How well are you doing? Each yes means you are supporting your child's attendance. For each no answer, try that idea.

 

 

 

09/07/18

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Help Your Child Earn Rewards for Perfect Attendance
September is designated as “Attendance Awareness Month”.  As parents, it is critical that we understand the importance of sending our children to school on time every day and making sure that they stay the entire day.  Because daily attendance is essential to educating our students, the Georgia Department of Education gives L.K. Moss and all schools in Georgia a score on our school report card in this area.  Specifically, we receive a score for the percent of students absent less than 10% of enrolled days.  In celebration of Attendance Awareness Month, I have challenged my “little friends” in Pre-Kindergarten – 5th grade to make a commitment to come to school on time each day and have perfect attendance for the remainder of the month starting Monday, Sept 10th.  To promote success, the challenge is broken up into 3 weeks (09/10-14, 09/17-21, and 09/24-28).  NOTE:  PERFECT ATTENDANCE FOR THE WEEK MEANS THE STUDENT CAME TO SCHOOL ON TIME (BEFORE 7:55 a.m.) AND STAYED THE ENTIRE DAY (2:40 p.m.) FOR ALL FIVE DAYS.  Students can earn rewards each week by simply having perfect attendance for each of the three weeks.  Weekly rewards include homework passes, Hats off to Perfect Attendance Day, dancing in the hallways, etc. Weekly perfect attendance for each grade level will be monitored on the counselors’ bulletin board on Eagle Avenue (the main hallway) as a visual reminder to encourage students.   At the end of the month, students with perfect attendance for the month (09/10-09/28) will earn the grand reward for Perfect Attendance for the Month.  How can you help?  Help your child earn rewards for perfect attendance by making sure that he/she attends school every day.  

 

 

08/31/18

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Focus on Attendance this school year
As we complete the first month of school, I challenge each parent to make daily attendance a top priority this school year.  Research shows that chronic absenteeism (missing 15 or more days in a school year) damages academic success. Unfortunately, more than seven million students across the nation miss three weeks or more each school year.  When students miss school or arrive late, everyone suffers. Teachers spend time collecting makeup work and reteaching. Meanwhile, other students—who are ready to learn—must wait. Your child’s most fundamental school-related responsibility is to get to school on time every day. So, if your child has come to school on time every day this first month of school, take time out to do something special to celebrate his/her one month perfect attendance.    Then, challenge your child to continue coming to school on time every day to earn First Nine Weeks Perfect Attendance and its rewards.  If your child has already come to school late, checked out early, or missed days, help your child to get on track by using the following Tips to Support Attendance:  1.)  Stick to a schedule. Establish evening and morning habits that help your child be prepared. For example, select outfits and pack lunches at night.  2.)  Schedule carefully. Make medical and other appointments during non-school hours when possible. School should be a priority when planning family trips, too. If your child must be absent, work with the teacher to help your child complete makeup work.  3.)  Seek help when needed. Many problems contribute to missing school. If your family struggles with health, transportation, work, child care or other issues, talk with school staff. Our shared goal is to help children get to school and do their best.  (**Revised and reprinted with permission from the September 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)

 

 

 

 

08/24/18

COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT:  Practice “Breaking the Ice” with your child
A new school year brings on a lot of new experiences for your child (new school, new grade level, new classmates, new teachers, etc.). To help my old and new little friends, I visited their classrooms and taught lessons that focused on “breaking the ice” to make new friends in new settings like a new classroom.  Students participated in various activities that allowed them to initiate new friendships in the classroom.   As previously stated, these skills can be used in any new social setting experienced by your child so practice these Three Icebreakers that initiate new friendships  with your child:   1.)  Demonstrate good body language.  Encourage your child to hold his/her head up, shoulders straight, and back straight to make new friends.  Emphasize that this body language exhibits self-confidence and attracts others while students with their heads down and shoulders slumped appear to be unhappy and lack self-confidence.   2.)  Use good facial expressions.  Encourage your child to make eye contact and smile to initiate new friendships.  Remind him/her that making eye contact gets the person’s attention and a smiling face is a friendly face.  Smiles are contagious and they encourage others to be friendly.  3.)  Speak kind words (conversation).  Practice ICC with your child: INTRODUCE (I) himself/herself,   Compliment (C) by saying something nice, and find Common(C) interests by asking questionsAn emphasis was placed upon the idea that, just as we watch others to decide if we would like to pursue a friendship, others are watching us as well.  Therefore, it is important to make appropriate choices and demonstrate good personal behavior at all times.      

 

 

 

08/17/18
COUNSELOR’S SPOTLIGHT: Promote effective study habits for a successful school year Helping your child build homework and study skills is one of the most important ways you can help him/her succeed in school. The start of a new school year is the perfect time to begin. Here are some Tips to Promote Effective Study Habits: 1.) Choose a regular time and place for homework. It should be a quiet, comfortable spot free from distractions. Stock it with supplies, such as paper, pencils and a dictionary. 2.) Allow for some free time. Many kids need to blow off steam after school before settling into homework. Some like to exercise, talk about their days, or head straight for a snack. Keep healthy options available that will energize your child for work and play. 3.) Encourage organization. Effective studying starts with a to-do list. Older elementary school students should make one each day. 4.) Pay attention. Homework time is a chance for you to learn about your child. Does he/she excel at reading? Have trouble with spelling? Struggle with multiplication? 5.) Be supportive. Don’t ever do your child’s homework for him/her, but do stay nearby to supervise. It’s OK to answer questions and guide your child through problems. However, if he/she seems to be struggling, talk with the teacher. (**Revised and reprinted with permission from the September 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)

 

 

 

how-to-reach-a-reluctant-reader-

Motivate a Reluctant Reader with Appealing Reading Material 

You got your child’s third nine weeks report card and the reading grade really needs to improve the fourth and final nine weeks of school.  You want to help, but don’t know how.  Let’s face it, some kids just don’t like reading. One way to encourage your child to read is to help him/her find reading material related to things he/she is interested in. 

If your child loves soccer, for example, help find: 

  • A book about the history of the sport.
  • A how-to book with tips on improving his/her game.
  • A biography on a favorite player.
  • Kid-friendly websites that contain sports-related articles.

If you aren’t sure what your child likes, ask yourself:

  • What are three activities your child and his/her friends are involved in?
  • What are three adult activities he/she might like to try some day?
  • What were the last three books that he/she seemed to enjoy?

Revised and reprinted with permission from the March 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® (Elementary School Edition) newsletter.

3/23/18


 


Family Meeting Black  Family Meeting Hispanic  Family Meeting White

Family Meetings Help Promote Cooperation and Communication
 

Regular family meetings provide opportunities for families to connect and for children to learn important life skills. Led properly, these meetings can teach your child about responsibility, communication, negotiation and cooperation. 

To get the most out of meetings, use these Tips for Productive Family Meetings: 
1)  Meet regularly—once every week or two. In addition, allow family members to request a meeting if they have something important to discuss. 
2)  Make an agenda. Before each meeting, ask family members what they would like to discuss. Schedule enough time to discuss each topic, but try to keep the meeting under one hour. 
3)  Put someone in charge. The chairperson must stick to the agenda and give everyone a fair, uninterrupted say. Initially, the chairperson should be an adult. After a few meetings, consider letting your child give it a try. 
4)  Take turns. After one person describes an idea or problem, everyone can take turns explaining how they feel about it. Brainstorm solutions, giving each person time to contribute. Choose an idea—or a combination of ideas—to try, with parents having the final say.  5)  Write down decisions. As each decision is made, record the family’s plan. Keep notes in a journal or post the highlights on the refrigerator. Plan to revisit certain decisions or solutions at future meetings to discuss whether or not they are working. 

(**Reprinted with permission from the March 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)

3/9/18


Be Cool Come to School

Make School Attendance a Family Priority
One of the most vital parts of your child’s education is also one that’s easy to overlook. It’s attendance!
Study after study shows that when kids regularly miss school, their learning, and especially their literacy skills
 take a serious hit. Not only that, but young students with poor attendance tend to turn into older students
with poor attendance. Don’t let your child become one of them!

As we progress towards the end of the third nine weeks of school, keep your child on the road to school success with these
Tips for Good Attendance: 

1)  Take attendance seriously. As the parent, you set the tone. So be sure your child understands how much you value school and learning. If attendance is a priority for you, it will be a priority for your child. 

2)  Prepare at night. In the evening, help your child set out everything he/she needs to take to school the next day— backpack, completed homework, gym shoes, signed papers, etc. He/he should also pick out an outfit and decide what will be eaten for breakfast if breakfast is eaten at home. 

3)  Respect the school calendar. When possible, avoid scheduling appointments or family vacations that conflict with school. It will remind your child that there’s nowhere more important to be during the week than in school!

4) Talk to your child’s teacher if you are experiencing problems that often result in school absences. Many families face challenges with health, child care, transportation and other issues. Community programs may be able to help. 

**Remember: Marion County Board of Education policy states that students in grades 1-8 may have no more than fourteen (14) absences per school year.

(Revised and reprinted with permission from the February 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® Elementary School Edition newsletter.)

02/23/18


 

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